Tag Archives: String Quartet

Portrait CD by KAIROS

2016_Kairos_portrait

 
1. (co)ro(na) for ensemble 10:24
2. Pasaka for piano solo 05:15
3. Sinfonia for ensemble 03:25
4. b(ell tree)for string quartet 11:35
5. Ri for soprano and electronics 09:21
6. Poussla for ensemble and orchestra 14:47
7. Pasaka for piano and tape 08:43
8. Saxordionphonics for solo saxophone, accordion and orchestra 12:36
Total Time: 79:47
 
Artist(s):
Tokyo Sinfonietta, Benjamin Kobler, LENsemble (Lithuanian Ensemble Network), Chordos Quartet, Rita Balta, SWR Sinfonieorchester Baden-Baden und Freiburg, Marcus Weiss, Teodoro Anzellotti, WDR Sinfonieorchester Köln, Yasuaki Itakura, Vykintas Baltakas, Johannes Kalitzke, Emilio Pomárico
 

KAIROS-MUSIC
Catalogue No.: 0015004KAI
EAN Code: 9120040735043

New Work for Saxophone trio

Finished my new work for saxophone trio – for the fantastic Munich-based Sax Allemande Trio. The nasal and a bit rough sound of saxophone attracts me a lot and keeps me writing: after Saxordionphonics – a double concerto for sax, accordion and orchestra written for Witten in 2013 – and this latest trio, a new work for the Belgian Bl!ndman ensemble is waiting… This will be a double quartet: 4 sax + 4 strings. Next year.

Portrait Concert at the Festival “Sugrįžimai”, Vilnius / Lithuania

10 April, 6pm, Rotušė, Vilnius / Lithuania
Čiurlionis quartet
Rita Mačiliūnaitė (mezzo)
Ona Švabauskaitė (vc)
Rima Chačaturian (pno)
Jūratė Katinaitė (moderator)

A review by N.Prufer about the performance of b(ell tree) by JACK quartet in NY

16 oct. 2011, “Sounds of a New Century” Festival, New York (USA)

Columbia / University’s Miller Theatre, JACK quartet

(…) Another gem that I was able to hear on that beautiful Sunday was Vykintas Baltakas’ b[ell tree]. The virtuosic JACK Quartet did a fantastic job realizing the score. It opens very minimalistically, with some dotted rhythms, and then slowly a beautiful counterpoint develops, which reminded me of Shostakovich’s string quartets. And while it started so sparsely and perhaps timidly, we then heard elegant, confident lines weaving through and around each other, blossoming. Surprisingly, the composer’s muse for this beautiful piece was a Swiss cowbell, as per the program. I would love to hear what this composer has to offer next. (…)

Neil Prufer

I Care If You Listen